Learn the Early Signs of Early Childhood Hair Loss Conditions

Hair-Loss-in-Children

SUFFERING FROM HAIR LOSS CONDITIONS AT ANY AGE IS A CHALLENGE, BUT WHEN HAIR LOSS STRIKES CHILDREN, IT’S TIME TO ACT.

Have you noticed that your child is losing more hair than just a few strands in the bathtub or on their pillow? Here is how you can identify is there is reason for concern, or not.

Consult your physician if you notice:

  • Bald spots on their head
  • Loss of all eyelashes and/or eyebrows
  • Total loss of hair on their head
  • Excessive shedding of hair

Just because you notice the loss of hair in your child does not mean there is need for concern. Even with a diagnosis, the likelihood that it is something life threatening is very slim.

The most common diagnosis for hair loss in children is Alopecia. Alopecia in its three forms (Alopecia areata, Alopecia totalis, Alopecia universalis) affects over 5 million people in the United States alone — the majority of them diagnosed as children. Alopecia is an autoimmune condition where the body rejects the hair follicles, results in the loss of hair on the scalp or other parts of the body.

Consider that treatments are available for children and adults alike. Not only are medical treatments an option, but hair replacement such as wigs is a safe and viable way to cope.

There are many organizations, which provide support for children affected by Alopecia, and their families. The most popular in the United States in the National Alopecia Areata Foundation (NAAF) which is not only the leader in Alopecia research, but also the leader in support and awareness. NAAF has support group across the country, and hosts an annual support conference in June of each year.

Visit www.naaf.org for more information.