Hair Loss Concealers Work On Small Thinning Areas of Hair

Concealers (1)

SPRAY OR BRUSH-ON HAIR IS NOT AS SILLY AS IT SOUNDS. FOR PEOPLE WITH THINNING HAIR, IT CAN BE A QUICK, CONVINCING SOLUTION.

People experience degrees of hair thinning, often on the crown or top of the head. It may not be noticeable except when they expose that particular area. Their degree of hair thinning may not be so noticeable as to warrant hair transplant surgery or nonsurgical hair replacement, but may be addressed by use of a hair loss concealer.

Since hair loss occurs by degrees, the decision to use a concealer is a personal judgment call. As with concealers used on the skin to hide a blemish, hair loss concealers work to smooth out density differences over a small area, but is less convincing at hiding large and obvious thinning spots.

Such concealers are typically fibrous pigments that attach to existing hair or to the scalp itself, made up of polymers, keratin fibers, lanolin or other materials. In some cases, the fibers are electrostatically charged, drawn to existing hair as metal fibers are to a magnet. Otherwise, the concealer is in lotion or semi-solid form.

Hair loss concealers come in several forms to meet different needs: granular sprinkles applied with a shaker; aerosol, applied similarly to hair spray; brushed or wiped solids that coat and thicken longer shafts of hair to cover a thinning spot; and lotions that expand the volume of the hair itself.

Hair loss concealers work only when the haircut and hairstyle are appropriate. Most appealing, hair loss concealers and volumizers are a five-minute solution. With practice, the individual can incorporate the application of a concealer into daily grooming routines.